BitPay Review & User Guide 2020: Features, Security, Fees

How To End The Cryptocurrency Exchange "Wild West" Without Crippling Innovation


In case you haven't noticed the consultation paper, staff notice, and report on Quadriga, regulators are now clamping down on Canadian cryptocurrency exchanges. The OSC and other regulatory bodies are still interested in industry feedback. They have not put forward any official regulation yet. Below are some ideas/insights and a proposed framework.



Many of you have limited time to read the full proposal, so here are the highlights:

Offline Multi-Signature

Effective standards to prevent both internal and external theft. Exchange operators are trained and certified, and have a legal responsibility to users.

Regular Transparent Audits

Provides visibility to Canadians that their funds are fully backed on the exchange, while protecting privacy and sensitive platform information.

Insurance Requirements

Establishment of basic insurance standards/strategy, to expand over time. Removing risk to exchange users of any hot wallet theft.


Background and Justifications


Cold Storage Custody/Management
After reviewing close to 100 cases, all thefts tend to break down into more or less the same set of problems:
• Funds stored online or in a smart contract,
• Access controlled by one person or one system,
• 51% attacks (rare),
• Funds sent to the wrong address (also rare), or
• Some combination of the above.
For the first two cases, practical solutions exist and are widely implemented on exchanges already. Offline multi-signature solutions are already industry standard. No cases studied found an external theft or exit scam involving an offline multi-signature wallet implementation. Security can be further improved through minimum numbers of signatories, background checks, providing autonomy and legal protections to each signatory, establishing best practices, and a training/certification program.
The last two transaction risks occur more rarely, and have never resulted in a loss affecting the actual users of the exchange. In all cases to date where operators made the mistake, they've been fully covered by the exchange platforms.
• 51% attacks generally only occur on blockchains with less security. The most prominent cases have been Bitcoin Gold and Ethereum Classic. The simple solution is to enforce deposit limits and block delays such that a 51% attack is not cost-effective.
• The risk of transactions to incorrect addresses can be eliminated by a simple test transaction policy on large transactions. By sending a small amount of funds prior to any large withdrawals/transfers as a standard practice, the accuracy of the wallet address can be validated.
The proposal covers all loss cases and goes beyond, while avoiding significant additional costs, risks, and limitations which may be associated with other frameworks like SOC II.

On The Subject of Third Party Custodians
Many Canadian platforms are currently experimenting with third party custody. From the standpoint of the exchange operator, they can liberate themselves from some responsibility of custody, passing that off to someone else. For regulators, it puts crypto in similar categorization to oil, gold, and other commodities, with some common standards. Platform users would likely feel greater confidence if the custodian was a brand they recognized. If the custodian was knowledgeable and had a decent team that employed multi-sig, they could keep assets safe from internal theft. With the right protections in place, this could be a great solution for many exchanges, particularly those that lack the relevant experience or human resources for their own custody systems.
However, this system is vulnerable to anyone able to impersonate the exchange operators. You may have a situation where different employees who don't know each other that well are interacting between different companies (both the custodian and all their customers which presumably isn't just one exchange). A case study of what can go wrong in this type of environment might be Bitpay, where the CEO was tricked out of 5000 bitcoins over 3 separate payments by a series of emails sent legitimately from a breached computer of another company CEO. It's also still vulnerable to the platform being compromised, as in the really large $70M Bitfinex hack, where the third party Bitgo held one key in a multi-sig wallet. The hacker simply authorized the withdrawal using the same credentials as Bitfinex (requesting Bitgo to sign multiple withdrawal transactions). This succeeded even with the use of multi-sig and two heavily security-focused companies, due to the lack of human oversight (basically, hot wallet). Of course, you can learn from these cases and improve the security, but so can hackers improve their deception and at the end of the day, both of these would have been stopped by the much simpler solution of a qualified team who knew each other and employed multi-sig with properly protected keys. It's pretty hard to beat a human being who knows the business and the typical customer behaviour (or even knows their customers personally) at spotting fraud, and the proposed multi-sig means any hacker has to get through the scrutiny of 3 (or more) separate people, all of whom would have proper training including historical case studies.
There are strong arguments both for and against using use of third party custodians. The proposal sets mandatory minimum custody standards would apply regardless if the cold wallet signatories are exchange operators, independent custodians, or a mix of both.

On The Subject Of Insurance
ShakePay has taken the first steps into this new realm (congratulations). There is no question that crypto users could be better protected by the right insurance policies, and it certainly feels better to transact with insured platforms. The steps required to obtain insurance generally place attention in valuable security areas, and in this case included a review from CipherTrace. One of the key solutions in traditional finance comes from insurance from entities such as the CDIC.
However, historically, there wasn't found any actual insurance payout to any cryptocurrency exchange, and there are notable cases where insurance has not paid. With Bitpay, for example, the insurance agent refused because the issue happened to the third party CEO's computer instead of anything to do with Bitpay itself. With the Youbit exchange in South Korea, their insurance claim was denied, and the exchange ultimately ended up instead going bankrupt with all user's funds lost. To quote Matt Johnson in the original Lloyd's article: “You can create an insurance policy that protects no one – you know there are so many caveats to the policy that it’s not super protective.”
ShakePay's insurance was only reported to cover their cold storage, and “physical theft of the media where the private keys are held”. Physical theft has never, in the history of cryptocurrency exchange cases reviewed, been reported as the cause of loss. From the limited information of the article, ShakePay made it clear their funds are in the hands of a single US custodian, and at least part of their security strategy is to "decline[] to confirm the custodian’s name on the record". While this prevents scrutiny of the custodian, it's pretty silly to speculate that a reasonably competent hacking group couldn't determine who the custodian is. A far more common infiltration strategy historically would be social engineering, which has succeeded repeatedly. A hacker could trick their way into ShakePay's systems and request a fraudulent withdrawal, impersonate ShakePay and request the custodian to move funds, or socially engineer their way into the custodian to initiate the withdrawal of multiple accounts (a payout much larger than ShakePay) exploiting the standard procedures (for example, fraudulently initiating or override the wallet addresses of a real transfer). In each case, nothing was physically stolen and the loss is therefore not covered by insurance.
In order for any insurance to be effective, clear policies have to be established about what needs to be covered. Anything short of that gives Canadians false confidence that they are protected when they aren't in any meaningful way. At this time, the third party insurance market does not appear to provide adequate options or coverage, and effort is necessary to standardize custody standards, which is a likely first step in ultimately setting up an insurance framework.
A better solution compared to third party insurance providers might be for Canadian exchange operators to create their own collective insurance fund, or a specific federal organization similar to the CDIC. Such an organization would have a greater interest or obligation in paying out actual cases, and that would be it's purpose rather than maximizing it's own profit. This would be similar to the SAFU which Binance has launched, except it would cover multiple exchanges. There is little question whether the SAFU would pay out given a breach of Binance, and a similar argument could be made for a insurance fund managed by a collective of exchange operators or a government organization. While a third party insurance provider has the strong market incentive to provide the absolute minimum coverage and no market incentive to payout, an entity managed by exchange operators would have incentive to protect the reputation of exchange operators/the industry, and the government should have the interest of protecting Canadians.

On The Subject of Fractional Reserve
There is a long history of fractional reserve failures, from the first banks in ancient times, through the great depression (where hundreds of fractional reserve banks failed), right through to the 2008 banking collapse referenced in the first bitcoin block. The fractional reserve system allows banks to multiply the money supply far beyond the actual cash (or other assets) in existence, backed only by a system of debt obligations of others. Safely supporting a fractional reserve system is a topic of far greater complexity than can be addressed by a simple policy, and when it comes to cryptocurrency, there is presently no entity reasonably able to bail anyone out in the event of failure. Therefore, this framework is addressed around entities that aim to maintain 100% backing of funds.
There may be some firms that desire but have failed to maintain 100% backing. In this case, there are multiple solutions, including outside investment, merging with other exchanges, or enforcing a gradual restoration plan. All of these solutions are typically far better than shutting down the exchange, and there are multiple cases where they've been used successfully in the past.

Proof of Reserves/Transparency/Accountability
Canadians need to have visibility into the backing on an ongoing basis.
The best solution for crypto-assets is a Proof of Reserve. Such ideas go back all the way to 2013, before even Mt. Gox. However, no Canadian exchange has yet implemented such a system, and only a few international exchanges (CoinFloor in the UK being an example) have. Many firms like Kraken, BitBuy, and now ShakePay use the Proof of Reserve term to refer to lesser proofs which do not actually cryptographically prove the full backing of all user assets on the blockchain. In order for a Proof of Reserve to be effective, it must actually be a complete proof, and it needs to be understood by the public that is expected to use it. Many firms have expressed reservations about the level of transparency required in a complete Proof of Reserve (for example Kraken here). While a complete Proof of Reserves should be encouraged, and there are some solutions in the works (ie TxQuick), this is unlikely to be suitable universally for all exchange operators and users.
Given the limitations, and that firms also manage fiat assets, a more traditional audit process makes more sense. Some Canadian exchanges (CoinSquare, CoinBerry) have already subjected themselves to annual audits. However, these results are not presently shared publicly, and there is no guarantee over the process including all user assets or the integrity and independence of the auditor. The auditor has been typically not known, and in some cases, the identity of the auditor is protected by a NDA. Only in one case (BitBuy) was an actual report generated and publicly shared. There has been no attempt made to validate that user accounts provided during these audits have been complete or accurate. A fraudulent fractional exchange, or one which had suffered a breach they were unwilling to publicly accept (see CoinBene), could easily maintain a second set of books for auditors or simply exclude key accounts to pass an individual audit.
The proposed solution would see a reporting standard which includes at a minimum - percentage of backing for each asset relative to account balances and the nature of how those assets are stored, with ownership proven by the auditor. The auditor would also publicly provide a "hash list", which they independently generate from the accounts provided by the exchange. Every exchange user can then check their information against this public "hash list". A hash is a one-way form of encryption, which fully protects the private information, yet allows anyone who knows that information already to validate that it was included. Less experienced users can take advantage of public tools to calculate the hash from their information (provided by the exchange), and thus have certainty that the auditor received their full balance information. Easy instructions can be provided.
Auditors should be impartial, their identities and process public, and they should be rotated so that the same auditor is never used twice in a row. Balancing the cost of auditing against the needs for regular updates, a 6 month cycle likely makes the most sense.

Hot Wallet Management
The best solution for hot wallets is not to use them. CoinBerry reportedly uses multi-sig on all withdrawals, and Bitmex is an international example known for their structure devoid of hot wallets.
However, many platforms and customers desire fast withdrawal processes, and human validation has a cost of time and delay in this process.
A model of self-insurance or separate funds for hot wallets may be used in these cases. Under this model, a platform still has 100% of their client balance in cold storage and holds additional funds in hot wallets for quick withdrawal. Thus, the risk of those hot wallets is 100% on exchange operators and not affecting the exchange users. Since most platforms typically only have 1%-5% in hot wallets at any given time, it shouldn't be unreasonable to build/maintain these additional reserves over time using exchange fees or additional investment. Larger withdrawals would still be handled at regular intervals from the cold storage.
Hot wallet risks have historically posed a large risk and there is no established standard to guarantee secure hot wallets. When the government of South Korea dispatched security inspections to multiple exchanges, the results were still that 3 of them got hacked after the inspections. If standards develop such that an organization in the market is willing to insure the hot wallets, this could provide an acceptable alternative. Another option may be for multiple exchange operators to pool funds aside for a hot wallet insurance fund. Comprehensive coverage standards must be established and maintained for all hot wallet balances to make sure Canadians are adequately protected.

Current Draft Proposal

(1) Proper multi-signature cold wallet storage.
(a) Each private key is the personal and legal responsibility of one person - the “signatory”. Signatories have special rights and responsibilities to protect user assets. Signatories are trained and certified through a course covering (1) past hacking and fraud cases, (2) proper and secure key generation, and (3) proper safekeeping of private keys. All private keys must be generated and stored 100% offline by the signatory. If even one private keys is ever breached or suspected to be breached, the wallet must be regenerated and all funds relocated to a new wallet.
(b) All signatories must be separate background-checked individuals free of past criminal conviction. Canadians should have a right to know who holds their funds. All signing of transactions must take place with all signatories on Canadian soil or on the soil of a country with a solid legal system which agrees to uphold and support these rules (from an established white-list of countries which expands over time).
(c) 3-5 independent signatures are required for any withdrawal. There must be 1-3 spare signatories, and a maximum of 7 total signatories. The following are all valid combinations: 3of4, 3of5, 3of6, 4of5, 4of6, 4of7, 5of6, or 5of7.
(d) A security audit should be conducted to validate the cold wallet is set up correctly and provide any additional pertinent information. The primary purpose is to ensure that all signatories are acting independently and using best practices for private key storage. A report summarizing all steps taken and who did the audit will be made public. Canadians must be able to validate the right measures are in place to protect their funds.
(e) There is a simple approval process if signatories wish to visit any country outside Canada, with a potential whitelist of exempt countries. At most 2 signatories can be outside of aligned jurisdiction at any given time. All exchanges would be required to keep a compliant cold wallet for Canadian funds and have a Canadian office if they wish to serve Canadian customers.
(2) Regular and transparent solvency audits.
(a) An audit must be conducted at founding, after 3 months of operation, and at least once every 6 months to compare customer balances against all stored cryptocurrency and fiat balances. The auditor must be known, independent, and never the same twice in a row.
(b) An audit report will be published featuring the steps conducted in a readable format. This should be made available to all Canadians on the exchange website and on a government website. The report must include what percentage of each customer asset is backed on the exchange, and how those funds are stored.
(c) The auditor will independently produce a hash of each customer's identifying information and balance as they perform the audit. This will be made publicly available on the exchange and government website, along with simplified instructions that each customer can use to verify that their balance was included in the audit process.
(d) The audit needs to include a proof of ownership for any cryptocurrency wallets included. A satoshi test (spending a small amount) or partially signed transaction both qualify.
(e) Any platform without 100% reserves should be assessed on a regular basis by a government or industry watchdog. This entity should work to prevent any further drop, support any private investor to come in, or facilitate a merger so that 100% backing can be obtained as soon as possible.
(3) Protections for hot wallets and transactions.
(a) A standardized list of approved coins and procedures will be established to constitute valid cold storage wallets. Where a multi-sig process is not natively available, efforts will be undertaken to establish a suitable and stable smart contract standard. This list will be expanded and improved over time. Coins and procedures not on the list are considered hot wallets.
(b) Hot wallets can be backed by additional funds in cold storage or an acceptable third-party insurance provider with a comprehensive coverage policy.
(c) Exchanges are required to cover the full balance of all user funds as denominated in the same currency, or double the balance as denominated in bitcoin or CAD using an established trading rate. If the balance is ever insufficient due to market movements, the firm must rectify this within 24 hours by moving assets to cold storage or increasing insurance coverage.
(d) Any large transactions (above a set threshold) from cold storage to any new wallet addresses (not previously transacted with) must be tested with a smaller transaction first. Deposits of cryptocurrency must be limited to prevent economic 51% attacks. Any issues are to be covered by the exchange.
(e) Exchange platforms must provide suitable authentication for users, including making available approved forms of two-factor authentication. SMS-based authentication is not to be supported. Withdrawals must be blocked for 48 hours in the event of any account password change. Disputes on the negligence of exchanges should be governed by case law.

Steps Forward

Continued review of existing OSC feedback is still underway. More feedback and opinions on the framework and ideas as presented here are extremely valuable. The above is a draft and not finalized.
The process of further developing and bringing a suitable framework to protect Canadians will require the support of exchange operators, legal experts, and many others in the community. The costs of not doing such are tremendous. A large and convoluted framework, one based on flawed ideas or implementation, or one which fails to properly safeguard Canadians is not just extremely expensive and risky for all Canadians, severely limiting to the credibility and reputation of the industry, but an existential risk to many exchanges.
The responsibility falls to all of us to provide our insight and make our opinions heard on this critical matter. Please take the time to give your thoughts.
submitted by azoundria2 to QuadrigaInitiative [link] [comments]

Big stores are giving people a false sense of security, start supporting stores that use escrow

It was great to see large companies like Overstock, Expedia and others to start accepting bitcoin. Now its time for the next step. Multi sig has been around for a while, and can be used with a 3rd party arbitrator. Traditionally credit cards will act as an arbitrator, think of credit cards as having 180 day escrow, the time limit for chargebacks.
most big companies use bitpay, and bitpay does some vetting to make sure the company provides good service. but bitpay still expects you to send direct.
while they companies are trust worthy, and will correct issues with product quality, they are getting people comfortable with sending direct, with no form of protection. new users who are just getting started have no awareness of the issue.
Many people like to support smaller businesses. and there are lots of great small businesses out there that will do everything they can to provide good products/services. But there are many fake small business scammers out there. Escrow can protect against this.
Sites big and small could get hacked, users could end up on the wrong site, and blindly send btc to the wrong address. and arbitrator might catch this.
arbitration is not perfect and can also have issues, or an arbitrator could be a scammer. Its important that arbitration be decentralized, not just one big company like bitpay, but lots of individuals.
When the consumer losses out due to scams the consumer is a direct victim. but it also hurts the crypto community, giving a bad image, and good businesses end up with customer base that has less money to put towards the good businesses that deserve it.
There are a few ways to go about using escrow with multisig. The first is direct wallets, with manual setup. Electrum and Copay/bitpay wallets are wallets that support multisig. the most popular way would be a 2 of 3 wallet. where 2 signers out of 3 people are needed to finalize a transaction. if everything goes well the buyer and seller are involved. if there is an issue the arbitrator will review evidence, and side with one or the other. Manual also allows for upto 10 signers) The other ways are a more automated way of doing the same thing. Bitrated is one of them. the buyer will select someone they will be buying off, and an arbitrator. it also allows you to link social media, and has a rating system based on your social media following/reputation, and your trades on platform. The other popular place is OpenBazaar. In OpenBazaar2 anyone can be an arbitrator, there is also a verified moderator, that has been checked by the OpenBazaar team to be a good crypto community member. also altcoins can be used in OpenBazaar2. Bithalo is similar to openbazaar but with double escrow, this gives both buyer and seller more incentive to be serious and honest. I meant to play with it more, but i was inspired to start writing and get this out.
Bisq is an exchange, one of the only ones where you have the keys. currently the developer serves as the arbitrator, but hopefully in future releases it will be opened up to members of the community. Bisq is software that runs on mac/win/linux for exchanging fiat to/from btc or btc to/from altscoins. All other exchanges you don't have the keys, and should not be trusted as much as people do. Binance is looking to become more like bisq, but currently binance is centralized and has the key. as far as I know, no other exchange is working towards this for bitcoin. there are some other decentralized exchanges- forkdelta for eth tokens only. bitshares, and maybe a few others I haven't spend much time on, like nem, waves, neo, maybe eos- the smart contract coins.
Manual Multisig is good for private, and one time use, or long term agreements where the wallets can be left active. Bitrated is good for checking reputation, and setting one time offers. OpenBazaar is good for the seller to list items for sale. The seller will choose various acceptable arbitrators, and from that list the buyer can choose an arbitrator. Have a significant number of arbitrators to choose from (manual may be difficult to find).
An additional advantage to utilizing multisig for crypto enthusiasts is more people will be hodling potentially for a few hours, days or even weeks. This can drive the btc price up.
an additional issue, especially for projects that may take weeks or months is price volatility. you'll have to agree on if you are strictly priced in btc, or if you are using a fiat exchange rate at the start of the transaction, or at the end of the transaction. or you might give the option to be whatever is more advantages to the business or customer.
This opens up some spaces for new companies to become arbitrators, and certain people may like a well established arbitrator, while others might like the small individual arbitrator. Anyone of the parties could even set themselves up to hedge the exchange rate to make more interesting offers.
I would hope that those who are true believers will start using escrow soon, and get people in the habit of transacting safely. Overstock seems to be a crypto ally so I hope to see them start sooner. Expedia seems like they just care about customer demand and the profit, so I don't expect as much from. There are many other examples, I just didn't want to spend the time to go through everything. There's lots of people already on bitrated, and openbazaar, that maybe need a little reminder, just how important their part is in escrow, and keeping the crypto community strong
https://www.bitrated.com/opticbit
OpenBazaar Verified Moderator ob2: QmcscQDiCuTSGxBeMD9qyXwRMcbLU5m9P1kupojYJdFdoh (Me)
submitted by opticbit to btc [link] [comments]

Article I wrote, Big Companies giving users a false sense of security, use escrow- openbazaar

It was great to see large companies like Overstock, Expedia and others to start accepting bitcoin. Now its time for the next step. Multi sig has been around for a while, and can be used with a 3rd party arbitrator. Traditionally credit cards will act as an arbitrator, think of credit cards as having 180 day escrow, the time limit for chargebacks.
most big companies use bitpay, and bitpay does some vetting to make sure the company provides good service. but bitpay still expects you to send direct.
while they companies are trust worthy, and will correct issues with product quality, they are getting people comfortable with sending direct, with no form of protection. new users who are just getting started have no awareness of the issue.
Many people like to support smaller businesses. and there are lots of great small businesses out there that will do everything they can to provide good products/services. But there are many fake small business scammers out there. Escrow can protect against this.
Sites big and small could get hacked, users could end up on the wrong site, and blindly send btc to the wrong address. and arbitrator might catch this.
arbitration is not perfect and can also have issues, or an arbitrator could be a scammer. Its important that arbitration be decentralized, not just one big company like bitpay, but lots of individuals.
When the consumer losses out due to scams the consumer is a direct victim. but it also hurts the crypto community, giving a bad image, and good businesses end up with customer base that has less money to put towards the good businesses that deserve it.
There are a few ways to go about using escrow with multisig. The first is direct wallets, with manual setup. Electrum and Copay/bitpay wallets are wallets that support multisig. the most popular way would be a 2 of 3 wallet. where 2 signers out of 3 people are needed to finalize a transaction. if everything goes well the buyer and seller are involved. if there is an issue the arbitrator will review evidence, and side with one or the other. Manual also allows for upto 10 signers) The other ways are a more automated way of doing the same thing. Bitrated is one of them. the buyer will select someone they will be buying off, and an arbitrator. it also allows you to link social media, and has a rating system based on your social media following/reputation, and your trades on platform. The other popular place is OpenBazaar. In OpenBazaar2 anyone can be an arbitrator, there is also a verified moderator, that has been checked by the OpenBazaar team to be a good crypto community member. also altcoins can be used in OpenBazaar2. Bithalo is similar to openbazaar but with double escrow, this gives both buyer and seller more incentive to be serious and honest. I meant to play with it more, but i was inspired to start writing and get this out.
Bisq is an exchange, one of the only ones where you have the keys. currently the developer serves as the arbitrator, but hopefully in future releases it will be opened up to members of the community. Bisq is software that runs on mac/win/linux for exchanging fiat to/from btc or btc to/from altscoins. All other exchanges you don't have the keys, and should not be trusted as much as people do. Binance is looking to become more like bisq, but currently binance is centralized and has the key. as far as I know, no other exchange is working towards this for bitcoin. there are some other decentralized exchanges- forkdelta for eth tokens only. bitshares, and maybe a few others I haven't spend much time on, like nem, waves, neo, maybe eos- the smart contract coins.
Manual Multisig is good for private, and one time use, or long term agreements where the wallets can be left active. Bitrated is good for checking reputation, and setting one time offers. OpenBazaar is good for the seller to list items for sale. The seller will choose various acceptable arbitrators, and from that list the buyer can choose an arbitrator. Have a significant number of arbitrators to choose from (manual may be difficult to find).
An additional advantage to utilizing multisig for crypto enthusiasts is more people will be hodling potentially for a few hours, days or even weeks. This can drive the btc price up.
an additional issue, especially for projects that may take weeks or months is price volatility. you'll have to agree on if you are strictly priced in btc, or if you are using a fiat exchange rate at the start of the transaction, or at the end of the transaction. or you might give the option to be whatever is more advantages to the business or customer.
This opens up some spaces for new companies to become arbitrators, and certain people may like a well established arbitrator, while others might like the small individual arbitrator. Anyone of the parties could even set themselves up to hedge the exchange rate to make more interesting offers.
I would hope that those who are true believers will start using escrow soon, and get people in the habit of transacting safely. Overstock seems to be a crypto ally so I hope to see them start sooner. Expedia seems like they just care about customer demand and the profit, so I don't expect as much from. There are many other examples, I just didn't want to spend the time to go through everything. There's lots of people already on bitrated, and openbazaar, that maybe need a little reminder, just how important their part is in escrow, and keeping the crypto community strong
https://www.bitrated.com/opticbit
OpenBazaar Verified Moderator ob2: QmcscQDiCuTSGxBeMD9qyXwRMcbLU5m9P1kupojYJdFdoh (Me)
submitted by opticbit to OpenBazaar [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrencies mixed this morning after yesterday's rally, study released suggesting hard-forks weaken market's stability


Sources:
https://bitcoinist.com/austin-introduces-blockchain-id-management-system-to-help-homeless-population/ https://www.coindesk.com/ethereums-vlad-zamfir-claims-breakthrough-in-blockchain-sharding/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/blockchain-browser-brave-files-adtech-complaints-against-google-for-user-data-practices https://bitcoinist.com/coinmarketcap-new-listing-vote/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/ceo-behind-gaw-miners-paycoin-ponzi-scheme-sentenced-to-21-months-in-prison https://cointelegraph.com/news/ibm-joins-decentralized-yellow-pages-for-blockchain-projects https://cointelegraph.com/news/trustnodes-icos-sold-160-000-ethereum-over-the-past-10-days https://cointelegraph.com/news/study-hard-forks-constitute-threat-to-cryptocurrency-stability https://cointelegraph.com/news/bitpay-cco-predicts-altcoins-to-never-come-back-bitcoin-to-rebound-in-2019 https://www.coindesk.com/sbi-to-roll-out-ripple-dlt-based-payments-app-on-ios-android/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/galaxy-digital-ceo-mike-novogratz-calls-crypto-price-bottom https://bitcoinist.com/no-such-thing-as-a-free-lunch-robinhood-user-info-sold/ https://cointelegraph.com/news/bitcoins-energy-consumption-in-summer-rise-or-fall https://www.coindesk.com/blockchain-developers-and-converts-swarm-r3s-cordacon/
submitted by QuantalyticsResearch to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Big stores without escrow or multisig give a false sense of security, support stores that use escrow.

It was great to see large companies like Overstock, Expedia and others to start accepting bitcoin. Now its time for the next step. Multi sig has been around for a while, and can be used with a 3rd party arbitrator. Traditionally credit cards will act as an arbitrator, think of credit cards as having 180 day escrow, the time limit for chargebacks.
most big companies use bitpay, and bitpay does some vetting to make sure the company provides good service. but bitpay still expects you to send direct.
while they companies are trust worthy, and will correct issues with product quality, they are getting people comfortable with sending direct, with no form of protection. new users who are just getting started have no awareness of the issue.
Many people like to support smaller businesses. and there are lots of great small businesses out there that will do everything they can to provide good products/services. But there are many fake small business scammers out there. Escrow can protect against this.
Sites big and small could get hacked, users could end up on the wrong site, and blindly send btc to the wrong address. and arbitrator might catch this.
arbitration is not perfect and can also have issues, or an arbitrator could be a scammer. Its important that arbitration be decentralized, not just one big company like bitpay, but lots of individuals.
When the consumer losses out due to scams the consumer is a direct victim. but it also hurts the crypto community, giving a bad image, and good businesses end up with customer base that has less money to put towards the good businesses that deserve it.
There are a few ways to go about using escrow with multisig. The first is direct wallets, with manual setup. Electrum and Copay/bitpay wallets are wallets that support multisig. the most popular way would be a 2 of 3 wallet. where 2 signers out of 3 people are needed to finalize a transaction. if everything goes well the buyer and seller are involved. if there is an issue the arbitrator will review evidence, and side with one or the other. Manual also allows for upto 10 signers) The other ways are a more automated way of doing the same thing. Bitrated is one of them. the buyer will select someone they will be buying off, and an arbitrator. it also allows you to link social media, and has a rating system based on your social media following/reputation, and your trades on platform. The other popular place is OpenBazaar. In OpenBazaar2 anyone can be an arbitrator, there is also a verified moderator, that has been checked by the OpenBazaar team to be a good crypto community member. also altcoins can be used in OpenBazaar2. Bithalo is similar to openbazaar but with double escrow, this gives both buyer and seller more incentive to be serious and honest. I meant to play with it more, but i was inspired to start writing and get this out.
Bisq is an exchange, one of the only ones where you have the keys. currently the developer serves as the arbitrator, but hopefully in future releases it will be opened up to members of the community. Bisq is software that runs on mac/win/linux for exchanging fiat to/from btc or btc to/from altscoins. All other exchanges you don't have the keys, and should not be trusted as much as people do. Binance is looking to become more like bisq, but currently binance is centralized and has the key. as far as I know, no other exchange is working towards this for bitcoin. there are some other decentralized exchanges- forkdelta for eth tokens only. bitshares, and maybe a few others I haven't spend much time on, like nem, waves, neo, maybe eos- the smart contract coins.
Manual Multisig is good for private, and one time use, or long term agreements where the wallets can be left active. Bitrated is good for checking reputation, and setting one time offers. OpenBazaar is good for the seller to list items for sale. The seller will choose various acceptable arbitrators, and from that list the buyer can choose an arbitrator. Have a significant number of arbitrators to choose from (manual may be difficult to find).
An additional advantage to utilizing multisig for crypto enthusiasts is more people will be hodling potentially for a few hours, days or even weeks. This can drive the btc price up.
an additional issue, especially for projects that may take weeks or months is price volatility. you'll have to agree on if you are strictly priced in btc, or if you are using a fiat exchange rate at the start of the transaction, or at the end of the transaction. or you might give the option to be whatever is more advantages to the business or customer.
This opens up some spaces for new companies to become arbitrators, and certain people may like a well established arbitrator, while others might like the small individual arbitrator. Anyone of the parties could even set themselves up to hedge the exchange rate to make more interesting offers.
I would hope that those who are true believers will start using escrow soon, and get people in the habit of transacting safely. Overstock seems to be a crypto ally so I hope to see them start sooner. Expedia seems like they just care about customer demand and the profit, so I don't expect as much from. There are many other examples, I just didn't want to spend the time to go through everything. There's lots of people already on bitrated, and openbazaar, that maybe need a little reminder, just how important their part is in escrow, and keeping the crypto community strong
https://www.bitrated.com/opticbit
OpenBazaar Verified Moderator ob2: QmcscQDiCuTSGxBeMD9qyXwRMcbLU5m9P1kupojYJdFdoh (Me)
submitted by opticbit to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Big stores are giving people a false sense of security, start supporting stores that use escrow

It was great to see large companies like Overstock, Expedia and others to start accepting bitcoin. Now its time for the next step. Multi sig has been around for a while, and can be used with a 3rd party arbitrator. Traditionally credit cards will act as an arbitrator, think of credit cards as having 180 day escrow, the time limit for chargebacks.
most big companies use bitpay, and bitpay does some vetting to make sure the company provides good service. but bitpay still expects you to send direct.
while they companies are trust worthy, and will correct issues with product quality, they are getting people comfortable with sending direct, with no form of protection. new users who are just getting started have no awareness of the issue.
Many people like to support smaller businesses. and there are lots of great small businesses out there that will do everything they can to provide good products/services. But there are many fake small business scammers out there. Escrow can protect against this.
Sites big and small could get hacked, users could end up on the wrong site, and blindly send btc to the wrong address. and arbitrator might catch this.
arbitration is not perfect and can also have issues, or an arbitrator could be a scammer. Its important that arbitration be decentralized, not just one big company like bitpay, but lots of individuals.
When the consumer losses out due to scams the consumer is a direct victim. but it also hurts the crypto community, giving a bad image, and good businesses end up with customer base that has less money to put towards the good businesses that deserve it.
There are a few ways to go about using escrow with multisig. The first is direct wallets, with manual setup. Electrum and Copay/bitpay wallets are wallets that support multisig. the most popular way would be a 2 of 3 wallet. where 2 signers out of 3 people are needed to finalize a transaction. if everything goes well the buyer and seller are involved. if there is an issue the arbitrator will review evidence, and side with one or the other. Manual also allows for upto 10 signers) The other ways are a more automated way of doing the same thing. Bitrated is one of them. the buyer will select someone they will be buying off, and an arbitrator. it also allows you to link social media, and has a rating system based on your social media following/reputation, and your trades on platform. The other popular place is OpenBazaar. In OpenBazaar2 anyone can be an arbitrator, there is also a verified moderator, that has been checked by the OpenBazaar team to be a good crypto community member. also altcoins can be used in OpenBazaar2. Bithalo is similar to openbazaar but with double escrow, this gives both buyer and seller more incentive to be serious and honest. I meant to play with it more, but i was inspired to start writing and get this out.
Bisq is an exchange, one of the only ones where you have the keys. currently the developer serves as the arbitrator, but hopefully in future releases it will be opened up to members of the community. Bisq is software that runs on mac/win/linux for exchanging fiat to/from btc or btc to/from altscoins. All other exchanges you don't have the keys, and should not be trusted as much as people do. Binance is looking to become more like bisq, but currently binance is centralized and has the key. as far as I know, no other exchange is working towards this for bitcoin. there are some other decentralized exchanges- forkdelta for eth tokens only. bitshares, and maybe a few others I haven't spend much time on, like nem, waves, neo, maybe eos- the smart contract coins.
Manual Multisig is good for private, and one time use, or long term agreements where the wallets can be left active. Bitrated is good for checking reputation, and setting one time offers. OpenBazaar is good for the seller to list items for sale. The seller will choose various acceptable arbitrators, and from that list the buyer can choose an arbitrator. Have a significant number of arbitrators to choose from (manual may be difficult to find).
An additional advantage to utilizing multisig for crypto enthusiasts is more people will be hodling potentially for a few hours, days or even weeks. This can drive the btc price up.
an additional issue, especially for projects that may take weeks or months is price volatility. you'll have to agree on if you are strictly priced in btc, or if you are using a fiat exchange rate at the start of the transaction, or at the end of the transaction. or you might give the option to be whatever is more advantages to the business or customer.
This opens up some spaces for new companies to become arbitrators, and certain people may like a well established arbitrator, while others might like the small individual arbitrator. Anyone of the parties could even set themselves up to hedge the exchange rate to make more interesting offers.
I would hope that those who are true believers will start using escrow soon, and get people in the habit of transacting safely. Overstock seems to be a crypto ally so I hope to see them start sooner. Expedia seems like they just care about customer demand and the profit, so I don't expect as much from. There are many other examples, I just didn't want to spend the time to go through everything. There's lots of people already on bitrated, and openbazaar, that maybe need a little reminder, just how important their part is in escrow, and keeping the crypto community strong
https://www.bitrated.com/opticbit
OpenBazaar Verified Moderator ob2: QmcscQDiCuTSGxBeMD9qyXwRMcbLU5m9P1kupojYJdFdoh (Me)
submitted by opticbit to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Article I wrote about big companies giving users a false sense of security, use escrow- bitrated

It was great to see large companies like Overstock, Expedia and others to start accepting bitcoin. Now its time for the next step. Multi sig has been around for a while, and can be used with a 3rd party arbitrator. Traditionally credit cards will act as an arbitrator, think of credit cards as having 180 day escrow, the time limit for chargebacks.
most big companies use bitpay, and bitpay does some vetting to make sure the company provides good service. but bitpay still expects you to send direct.
while the companies are trust worthy, and will correct issues with product quality, they are getting people comfortable with sending direct, with no form of protection. new users who are just getting started have no awareness of the issue.
Many people like to support smaller businesses. and there are lots of great small businesses out there that will do everything they can to provide good products/services. But there are many fake small business scammers out there. Escrow can protect against this.
Sites big and small could get hacked, users could end up on the wrong site, and blindly send btc to the wrong address. an arbitrator might catch this.
arbitration is not perfect and can also have issues, or an arbitrator could be a scammer. Its important that arbitration be decentralized, not just one big company like bitpay, but lots of individuals.
When the consumer losses out due to scams the consumer is a direct victim. but it also hurts the crypto community, giving a bad image, and good businesses end up with a customer base that has less money to put towards the good businesses that deserve it.
There are a few ways to go about using escrow with multisig. The first is direct wallets, with manual setup. Electrum and Copay/bitpay wallets are wallets that support multisig. the most popular way would be a 2 of 3 wallet. where 2 signers out of 3 people are needed to finalize a transaction. if everything goes well the buyer and seller are involved. if there is an issue the arbitrator will review evidence, and side with one or the other. Manual also allows for upto 10 signers) The other ways are a more automated way of doing the same thing. Bitrated is one of them. the buyer will select someone they will be buying off, and an arbitrator. it also allows you to link social media, and has a rating system based on your social media following/reputation, and your trades on platform. The other popular place is OpenBazaar. In OpenBazaar2 anyone can be an arbitrator, there is also a verified moderator, that has been checked by the OpenBazaar team to be a good crypto community member. also altcoins can be used in OpenBazaar2. Bithalo is similar to openbazaar but with double escrow, this gives both buyer and seller more incentive to be serious and honest. I meant to play with it more, but i was inspired to start writing and get this out.
Bisq is an exchange, one of the only ones where you have the keys. currently the developer serves as the arbitrator, but hopefully in future releases it will be opened up to members of the community. Bisq is software that runs on mac/win/linux for exchanging fiat to/from btc or btc to/from altscoins. All other exchanges you don't have the keys, and should not be trusted as much as people do. Binance is looking to become more like bisq, but currently binance is centralized and has the key. as far as I know, no other exchange is working towards this for bitcoin. there are some other decentralized exchanges- forkdelta for eth tokens only. bitshares, and maybe a few others I haven't spent much time on, like nem, waves, neo, maybe eos- the smart contract coins.
Manual Multisig is good for private, and one time use, or long term agreements where the wallets can be left active. Bitrated is good for checking reputation, and setting one time offers. OpenBazaar is good for the seller to list items for sale. The seller will choose various acceptable arbitrators, and from that list the buyer can choose an arbitrator. Have a significant number of arbitrators to choose from (manual may be difficult to find).
An additional advantage to utilizing multisig for crypto enthusiasts is more people will be hodling potentially for a few hours, days or even weeks. This can drive the btc price up.
an additional issue, especially for projects that may take weeks or months is price volatility. you'll have to agree on if you are strictly priced in btc, or if you are using a fiat exchange rate at the start of the transaction, or at the end of the transaction. or you might give the option to be whatever is more advantagious to the business or customer.
This opens up some spaces for new companies to become arbitrators, and certain people may like a well established arbitrator, while others might like the small individual arbitrator. Anyone of the parties could even set themselves up to hedge the exchange rate to make more interesting offers.
I would hope that those who are true believers will start using escrow soon, and get people in the habit of transacting safely. Overstock seems to be a crypto ally so I hope to see them start sooner. Expedia seems like they just care about customer demand and the profit, so I don't expect as much from. There are many other examples, I just didn't want to spend the time to go through everything. There's lots of people already on bitrated, and openbazaar, that maybe need a little reminder, just how important their part is in escrow, and keeping the crypto community strong
https://www.bitrated.com/opticbit
OpenBazaar Verified Moderator ob2: QmcscQDiCuTSGxBeMD9qyXwRMcbLU5m9P1kupojYJdFdoh (Me)
submitted by opticbit to Bitrated [link] [comments]

Binance FULL Review & Tutorial - How To Buy/Trade Bitcoin ... Bitcoin - Como Enviar de Coinbase a Binance - YouTube Bitcoin Trading Philippines for Beginners Tutorial 2020 ... FINALLY A LUXURY CRYPTOCURRENCY CARD! NO MORE BITPAY CARD! COMO COMPRAR BITCOIN COM CARTÃO DE CRÉDITO NA BINANCE ... Ist Bitcoin Trader Betrug? (Erfahrungen und Test) - YouTube Cryptocurrency Billionaire Reveals Bitcoin Predictions for ... How to Withdraw Bitcoin from a Bitcoin Exchange to a ... Bitcoin Halving Bull Run? Binance Launches Bitcoin Mining Pool - BitPay BUSD - Kim Jong Un BTC Stash XXL Binance Tutorial: Kryptowährungen kaufen und tauschen ...

Bitpay is one of the oldest Bitcoin payment service providers. It was founded in 2011 and has seen the best and worst of the cryptocurrency market. The company is based in Atlanta, Georgia. It offers merchants a payment processing solution for customers that want to spend Bitcoin. As of 2014, Bitpay was processing more than $1 million in daily cryptocurrency transactions. Bitpay has ... Also read: Ledger Nano S Review: Can This $65 Device Top Trezor? The Bitpay Visa Debit Card. Just recently I ordered the Bitpay bitcoin Visa card, available to U.S. residents in all fifty states ... Anschließend kann im BitPay Review die Bitcoins bzw. Bitcoin Cash in verschiedensten Währungen auszahlen lassen. BitPay funktioniert dabei in 38 Ländern, darunter Deutschland. BitPay Wallet einrichten – So geht´s. Die BitPay Wallet einrichten ist relativ unkompliziert. Das trifft sowohl auf die mobile Anmeldung, als auch auf die Anmeldung ... itBit Review: Conclusion. ItBit is considered one of the top cryptocurrency exchanges. And after reading this itBit review you can see their reputation is certainly well deserved. Both ItBit’s exchange and OTC desk are easy-to-use, fast, secure, and reliable platforms for buying Bitcoin. That being said, we can’t forget the fact that ItBit ... Bitpay Visa Card. The BitPay Visa Card was launched in 2016 amidst lots of positive responses from users. The card as tethered to a Wave Crest Backing. Wave Crest is a European Card Issuer. Within no time, BitPay changed its Bitcoin processing firm from Wave Crest to Metropolitan Commercial Bank. A decision sparked by a service disruption ... Bitcoin en review. BY Lenín Navas ... Así, podemos encontrar a gigantes de la industria como BitPay, Xapo, Blockchain o Coinbase, todos ellos ofreciendo soporte al BTC en sus plataformas. Así como los principales exchanges del mercado como Binance y BitMEX. Conclusiones. Las criptomonedas gozan de buena salud. Y la primera entre ellas, el Bitcoin, es una prueba de ello. Sin embargo, esto no ... BitBay Review – A Beginner’s Guide. By: Ofir Beigel Last updated: 5/4/20. BitBay is the third largest cryptocurrency exchange in Europe. In this review, I’ll cover the different exchange services and let you know what to look out for before signing up. BitBay Review Summary. BitBay initially started out as a dedicated Polish exchange, however, due to its unregulated nature, it migrated ... BitPay Wallet Review. BitPay Inc. is an online cryptocurrency wallet company. In 2011, Jim Aviles and Stephen Pair started the company as Copay. The BitPay wallet gives owners access to store, send or receive Bitcoin (BTC) and Bitcoin Cash (BCH). All transactions go through an account that can be managed on multiple devices. BitPay is open ... 1.Does Bitcoin Have a Debit Card? No, it doesn’t. Bitcoin isn’t controlled by anyone so it can’t issue its own debit card.However, you can get a 3rd party prepaid debit card which you can load with Bitcoin and then buy almost anything.. While not many businesses accept payments in Bitcoin (yet), most accept debit cards. With a Bitcoin debit card, merchants get paid in their own currency ... BitPay Visa Card. In 2016 BitPay also announced that it was releasing a Visa Card. This announcement was immediately accepted by users within the crypto community even though the card did not support Bitcoin Cash at the time.

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Binance FULL Review & Tutorial - How To Buy/Trade Bitcoin ...

Learn the basics of Bitcoin Trading in Philippines for beginners. In this video I will show how to Buy and Sell or Trade btc to other altcoins. I will also s... #cryptocurrency #BAKKT #Bitcoin #altcoin #binance #kucoin #coinbase #ripple #cryptocurrencynews,#xrp #bnb #neo #bakkt #fidelitydigitalassets #bitcoinprice #bitcoinnews,#bitcoinpump #bitcoindump # ... CZ, founder and CEO of Binance, is LIVE with us to answer ALL your questions regarding bitcoin, binance, and cryptocurrency in 2020! [This is NOT sponsored!]... 🎥: How To Buy Bitcoin/Crypto w/ Binance! - Binance Tutorial & Review! - Buy, Sell, Trade, Earn etc... 🔔: Like, Subscribe & Turn on Notifications 🚩: Binance E... Aprenda como comprar Bitcoin com cartão de crédito na BINANCE BRASIL ! A Binance é uma bolsa internacional de moedas que fornece uma plataforma para a negoci... Traden auf Binance: https://coinfreund.com/c/binance/ Alle Infos zur Krypto-Exchange im Binance Tutorial auf Deutsch! XXL Binance Tutorial: Kryptowäh... If you want to use bitcoin for buying things online, you should use a bitcoin wallet that broadcasts transactions immediately. Most accounts and exchange ser... Binance Pool’s first product offering will be Bitcoin mining, using a FPPS payment method. - BitPay Partners With Binance to Support BUSD Payments Around the World Hacer un envío de Bitcoin o cualquier otra moneda a un Exchange como Binance parece ser un proceso complicado pero es más fácil de lo que piensas. Coinbase -... Coinbase: https://www.coinbase.com/join/59537b0d0cca1f02b4479ad4?locale=de eToro: http://partners.etoro.com/B10616_A71660_TClick.aspx In dem Video sprechen w...

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